Block internet ads for increased security

In the last year or two, advertisers with nefarious intent have been using popups to trick people into believing their computer is hacked. 

There’s been quite a lot of discussion on the internet regarding advertisements.  On the one hand, they’re a significant source of revenue for a lot of companies, both small and large.  On the other hand, they’re distracting and, with a slow internet connection, detrimental to your browsing experience.

However, in the last year or two, people and companies with nefarious intent have been using popup notices masquerading as internet advertisements to trick people into believing their computer is riddled with viruses or even hacked.  Searching for ‘fake virus alert’ images reveal dozens of fake alerts that can intimidate even the most web-savvy user. 

These fake infection alerts are on all types of legitimate websites.  Some of them have sound, and most of them won’t close through conventional means.  While they are generally taken down quickly when discovered, their prevalence suggests that there’s money to be made and they won’t be going away anytime soon. 

An ad blocker, added as an extension to your web browser, will block most advertisements, including these.  There are a lot of them out there, but there are a couple of free ones that do the job nicely.  We recommend uBlock Origin for Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari browsers, and AdBlock Plus for Internet Explorer (it works with other browsers too). 

It can be a little confusing to download the correct version of the ad blocker, so let us know which browser you use by sending us an email at support@quickfixgeek.com, and we’ll be happy to send you specific instructions to get the right ad blocker on your internet browser.

Today’s browsing experience includes mitigating risk, and adding a free ad blocker to your security plan is a great way to help keep your computer, and the data within it, safe and secure.

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