Honey? Google's calling (Spoiler: It isn't Google)

Have you ever received a call from a major corporation letting you know that something happened with your computer and/or order?

Have you ever received a call from Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Apple, Yahoo, or another large corporation letting you know that something happened with your computer and/or order?  It’s difficult to determine whether these calls are real or not; however, our one-step plan makes it easy to decide on the validity of the phone call.

  1. The call is fake. Do not let them pass Go. Do not let them collect $200 (or more).

That’s it!

Today, it’s reasonably safe to assume EVERY call stating they’re a large company is not them; it’s safer to hang up and move on with your day.

The same thing applies to pop-ups that say your computer is infected or needs service IMMEDIATELY.  If something like this shows up on your computer unannounced while you’re doing your thing on the internet and does any of the following, the likelihood it’s an attempt to steal your money rests pretty much at 100%:

  1. It asks you to call a number for help or click a link
  2. It broadcasts a verbal message
  3. You can’t close it through conventional means

The good news is that your computer isn’t affected.  The bad news is these can pop up anywhere while you’re browsing, from a newspaper’s website to a much scarier corner of the web: Quilting pattern forums.

The best thing to do is to go into your Task Manager and close everything that looks like your browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc.) or restart your computer.  Problem solved.

If you’re unconvinced of its fakery and think it may be legitimate, call or email QuickFix, let us know what you’re seeing (phone pics are fantastic for this!), and we’ll be happy to tell you if it’s real or fake.

Please err on the side of caution, and by that we mean assume it’s fake unless you’re 100% sure it’s not.  If there’s any glimmer of doubt, stop and reach out to us; we have your back!

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